My Blog

Posts for: May, 2018

By contactus@jamesreynoldsdds.com
May 24, 2018
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

This Memorial Day Holiday we remember and honor those members of our armed forces who made the ultimate sacrifice in their service to our country.  While enjoying a weekend full of activities with family and friends we ask that you consider taking a moment to honor these brave folks.  In observing Memorial Day our office will be closed Monday May 28th and will reopen Tuesday May 29th at 8:00am.


By James D. Reynolds, D.D.S., Ltd.
May 22, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: orthodontics   retainers  
ARetainerHelpsYouKeepYourNewSmileAfterBraces

Moving your teeth to a more functional and attractive alignment is a big undertaking. You can invest months — even years — and a lot of expense to correct a bad bite. But all that effort could be for nothing if your teeth return to their original positions.

The very aspect of dental physiology that makes orthodontics possible can work against you in reverse. Your teeth are not actually rigidly fixed in the bone: they're held in place by an elastic gum tissue known as the periodontal ligament. The ligament lies between the tooth and the bone and attaches to both with tiny fibers.

While this mechanism holds the teeth firmly in place, it also allows the teeth to move in response to changes in the mouth. As we age, for example, and the teeth wear, the ligament allows movement of the teeth to accommodate for the loss of tooth surface that might have been created by the wear.

When we employ braces we're changing the mouth environment by applying pressure to the teeth in a certain direction. The teeth move in response to this pressure. But when the pressure is no longer there after removing the braces or other orthodontic devices, the ligament mechanism may then respond with a kind of “muscle memory” to pull the teeth back to where they were before.

To prevent this, we need to help the teeth maintain their new position, at least until they've become firmly set. We do this with an oral appliance known as a retainer. Just as its name implies it helps the teeth “retain” their new position.

We require most patients to initially wear their retainer around the clock. After a while we can scale back to just a few hours a day, usually at nighttime. Younger patients may only need to wear a retainer for eighteen months or so. Adults, though, may need to wear one for much longer or in some cases permanently to maintain their new bite.

Although having to wear a retainer can be tedious at times, it's a crucial part of your orthodontic treatment. By wearing one you'll have a better chance of permanently keeping your new smile.

If you would like more information on caring for your teeth after braces, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Importance of Orthodontic Retainers.”


By James D. Reynolds, D.D.S., Ltd.
May 12, 2018
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: root canal  
RootCanalAwarenessWeekATimetoLearnHowTeethAreSaved

What’s the first thing that comes to mind when you think of the month of May? Balmy breezes? Sweet-smelling flowers? How about root canal treatment?

The last item might seem out of place…but for the last ten years, Root Canal Awareness week has been celebrated in May. So let’s take a closer look at this important—and often misunderstood—dental procedure.

What we commonly call a “root canal” is a special treatment that can save diseased teeth which might otherwise be lost. But the root canal itself is actually a set of hollow, branching passages deep inside the hard outer tissue of the tooth. The tiny “canals” contain the tooth’s soft pulp, including nerves, blood vessels and connective tissue. These tissues help teeth grow during childhood but aren’t necessary in healthy adult teeth—and, what’s worse, they can become infected via deep cavity or a crack in the tooth’s outer layers.

When bacteria infect the pulp tissue, the inflammation often causes intense discomfort. In time, the harmful microorganisms can also pass through the tooth’s root and into the tissue of the jaw, resulting in a painful abscess. Eventually, if it isn’t treated, the tooth will likely be lost.

Root canal treatment is designed to remove the infection, relieve the pain…and save the tooth. It is usually performed under anesthesia for your comfort. To begin the procedure, a small hole is made in the tooth’s enamel to give access to the pulp; then, tiny instruments are used to remove the diseased tissue and disinfect the tooth. Finally, it is sealed up against re-infection. Following treatment, a cap (or crown) is often needed to restore the tooth’s full function and appearance.

Despite some rumors you may have heard, root canal treatment is neither very painful nor likely to cause other health problems. So if you come across these discredited ideas, remember that dentists and dental specialists called endodontists perform some 25 million root canal procedures every year—and this treatment method  has been validated for decades.

Of course, like any medical procedure, root canal treatment is not 100% successful. While the procedure has a very high success rate, it’s possible that additional treatments will be needed in some cases. However, the alternative—extracting the tooth—has similar potential downsides; plus a replacement tooth will be needed to avoid the health and lifestyle troubles caused by missing teeth. But one thing is certain: Ignoring disease in the tooth’s soft tissues isn’t a good move, because the infection won’t go away on its own—and down the road it will only get worse.

So this May, while you’re taking time to smell the flowers, spare a thought for the often-misunderstood root canal. If you’d like more information on root canal treatment, please contact us or schedule a consultation. You can also learn more by reading the Dear Doctor magazine articles “A Step-By-Step Guide to Root Canal Treatment” and “Root Canal Treatment: What You Need to Know.”


By contactus@jamesreynoldsdds.com
May 10, 2018
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

As an integral part of each recare and checkup appointment our dental team will always be on the lookout for early signs of changes in your mouth including oral cancers.  While cleaning your teeth our hygienists will be examining your cheeks, roof of mouth, tongue, and floor of mouth looking for any irregularities.  Dr Reynolds will also include an oral cancer check during each of his examinations.  This is one of the many reasons it is important to stay on a routine schedule for recare and checkups in our office!

Dr. Reynolds has been a proud member of the Virginia Dental Association for more than 30 years.   


By contactus@jamesreynoldsdds.com
May 05, 2018
Category: Uncategorized
Tags: Untagged

Meet Rebecca, our Office Manager and Business Assistant!

Rebecca is a Roanoke native and graduated from Patrick Henry High School.  She has been working in the Dental field since 1995 and with Dr. Reynolds since 2016.  Rebecca is the pleasant voice you will hear on the phone, and the smiling face you will see at our reception and front desk area.  She is very good at simplifying the complexities of the various dental benefit plans, and works directly with patients scheduling their necessary appointments.  Rebecca has a very broad understanding of various Dental treatments and is happy to spend time with patients explaining their suggested treatments.  

We are very happy to have Rebecca on our Dental team as she is dedicated to our practice and always has a smile on her face!  We also love that Rebecca is an expert in her kitchen and shares her culinary expertise with us weekly.  When not in the office Rebecca spends her time with many activities with her husband and family.